Latest Project: Summer Pattern 2017 (Birds and Bees)

Added on by Nathan Hoang.
A first pass at the nested cactus and also a Damien Hirst I guess

A first pass at the nested cactus and also a Damien Hirst I guess

I like to make a pattern once a year. It started off with the popsicles and big cats in 2015. Then it was the chameleons in 2016. This yearly exercise wasn't planned, but I guess two's enough to make anything an annual tradition, so…let's go summer 2017!

My friend friend Casey likes cacti because it reminds her of New Mexico and I find birds nesting in cacti so fascinating because I want to know how elaborate it is inside and if it's like an I Dream of Genie situation where it's extremely spacious and comfortable inside or what's going on in there? So I started off with a sketch on my iPad to plan placement and positions.

I didn't like what was going on here so I left it alone for months. Two weeks ago, I flipped through a CommArts Photography Annual and saw Craig Cutler's image of a bee on a honeycomb and I couldn't stop thinking about it. So I decided to make complementary patterns for 2017, birds and bees.

But not like that, weirdo.

After a year of drawing animals on Procreate, I wanted learn how to use other iPad tools, like AstroPad, so I did everything there (except for Adobe Illustrator work).

First step was to get the vectors down and try out some different patterns. As usual, the simpler the better.

The next stop was the transfer the vector layers to Photoshop and paint over all of it while watching Grand Designs on Netflix in the back and wonder how these people with normal jobs can afford such lavish, custom-made, three-story houses with a pool in the basement.

Then I pasted the different shapes into Photoshop, painted over it using Kyle's Brushes. Then I went in and sketched out the placement of the bees, then painted the bodies, then the wings, then the antennae and legs, and then the shadows.

Then I pasted the different shapes into Photoshop, painted over it using Kyle's Brushes. Then I went in and sketched out the placement of the bees, then painted the bodies, then the wings, then the antennae and legs, and then the shadows.

Though I couldn't get these tubes to work as an illusion like the honeycomb hexagons, I think it turned out pretty ok. Pretty. Ok.

Though I couldn't get these tubes to work as an illusion like the honeycomb hexagons, I think it turned out pretty ok. Pretty. Ok.

Apparently, a lot of birds like owls and lovebirds like to hole up in cacti. But I chose woodpeckers because of their red caps. It's cute. And some cacti have those red balls on top of them, so it made sense.

See you in summer 2018.

Save our honeybees!